fbpx

You might think milk is milk, either way. Well, due to marketing campaigns of milk or milk-based products, all the different types of milk can get a little confusing.

If you aren’t sure which type of milk is the best for you and your family, Dr Kamarul Ariffin is here to help you! The friendly Twitterjaya doctor recently posted an extensive thread on the topic.

[Who knows the difference between fresh milk, full cream milk, skimmed milk, low-fat milk, filled milk, evaporated milk etc?

If you don’t know, then follow this thread!]

Is it just us or does the intro tweet already have you scratching your head? “Filled milk” is a completely new concept for us…

1. Fresh milk

Fresh milk is raw cows milk pasteurised (heated then cooled to specific temperatures) to kill harmful bacteria. It is sold in its original form (liquid). If imported, it is done so in liquid form. Because of this, it tends to be a little more expensive.

2. Full cream milk

Full cream milk is fresh milk that contains an average of 3.8% milk fat. It can be sold ready to drink or dehydrated into milk powder.

3. Low-fat milk

Low-fat milk is fresh milk that with some milk fats removed until only an average of 1.5% of milk fats are left. It is sold ready to drink or dehydrated into milk powder.

4. Skimmed milk

Skimmed milk is fresh milk with its milk fats removed until it only has on average 0.15% milk fats left. It is sold ready to drink or dehydrated into milk powder. Some times milk solids are added to make it taste better.

5. Heavy/whipping cream

Heavy/whipping cream is the thick part of milk that rises to the top due to its high-fat content. Cream contains up to 40% of milk fat. It has one of the highest fat contents compared to other dairy products. Whipping cream contains about 30% of milk fat.

6. Filled milk

Filled milk is fresh milk which has had it’s milk fats removed and replaced with vegetable fat (such as palm oil). Essentially, it is skimmed milk or milk solids mixed with vegetable fats used for baking and cooking purposes. Usually sold as evaporated milk or in powder form.

7. Evaporated milk

Evaporated milk is made by simmering fresh milk over low heat until 60% of its water is removed. The milk is then homogenised, which integrates all the fat molecules so they don’t separate over time. Usually, sugar is not added to this type of milk and it is naturally low in fat.

8. Sweetened condensed milk

Sweetened condensed milk is made by simmering fresh milk over low heat, like evaporated milk, until most of its water is removed. It then has sugar added to it to prolong its shelf life. Sugar prevents microorganisms from growing in the milk and helps to thicken it even further. The sugar is added after it is simmered and pasteurised.

9. Creamer

Creamer is dairy-free. Although ingredients vary from brand to brand, most creamers are made from a combination of water, sugar and vegetable oil. It is usually heavily processed with added sugar. It comes in liquid form and powder form. An unhealthy option.

10. Non-dairy milk

Non-dairy milk is derived from plant sources such as soy, almonds, coconut, rice and others. It is usually consumed by those who have allergies to milk, are lactose intolerant or vegan.

In response to the thread, several Twitter users had some points to clarify with Dr Kamarul.

Although milk does tend to contain some vitamins, Dr Kamarul advises negating the vitamins contained in milk saying that vegetables and fruits are much better sources of vitamins than milk.

As for formulated milk for children, Dr Kamarul says that cows milk does not contain enough nutrients required for babies and sometimes cows milk is not suitable for babies at all. Thus, for children below the age of 2, formulated milk recommended by the child’s doctor is the best type of milk for them (besides mother’s milk, of course).

So much info! Thanks to the good doctor for taking the time to educate us all on this!

And Twitterjaya really milked this doctor for info, didn’t they?

via GIPHY

(What is evaporated milk)
(Filled Milk)
(What is milk)
(What is heavy cream)
(What Is Sweetened Condensed Milk, Anyway?)
(Heavy Cream vs Half-and-Half vs Coffee Creamer: What's the Difference?)
Continue Reading

Related Posts

Related Posts

Related Posts

Next Post